The Development of Scientific Concepts in a Young Child: A Case Study

The Development of Scientific Concepts in a Young Child: A Case Study

The Development of Scientific Concepts in a Young Child: A Case Study

The Development of Scientific Concepts in a Young Child: A Case Study

Excerpt

IT HAS BEEN an accepted dictum in education that the child learns by experience. This phrase has come to mean many things to educators, psychologists, and laymen. The phrasing is so comprehensive that it seems to cover the whole gamut of living, so that it is difficult to envisage any other way in which learning could take place.

Of course, the dictum is not to be disputed. But it is not enough to say that the child learns through experience! This at once covers everything and pinpoints nothing. For the question remains: How does a child learn in that sense? That is: What is involved in an actual situation in which a child learns from experience?

The complicated process by which children learn even the most basic concepts is far from being understood. This is an area in which there is an urgent need for data, since a preeminent task of education is the formation of concepts.

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