Reds in America: The Present Status of the Revolutionary Movement in the U. S. Based on Documents Seized by the Authorities in the Raid upon the Convention of the Communist Party at Bridgman, Mich., Aug. 22, 1922

Reds in America: The Present Status of the Revolutionary Movement in the U. S. Based on Documents Seized by the Authorities in the Raid upon the Convention of the Communist Party at Bridgman, Mich., Aug. 22, 1922

Reds in America: The Present Status of the Revolutionary Movement in the U. S. Based on Documents Seized by the Authorities in the Raid upon the Convention of the Communist Party at Bridgman, Mich., Aug. 22, 1922

Reds in America: The Present Status of the Revolutionary Movement in the U. S. Based on Documents Seized by the Authorities in the Raid upon the Convention of the Communist Party at Bridgman, Mich., Aug. 22, 1922

Excerpt

Better to be despised for too anxious apprehensions, than ruined by too confident security . . . .

The effect of liberty to individuals is, that they may do what they please: we ought to see what it will please them to do, before we risk congratulations, which may soon turn into complaints. Prudence would dictate this in the case of separate insulated private men; but liberty, when men act in bodies, is power. Considerate people, before they declare themselves, will observe the use which is made of power; and particularly of so trying a thing as new power in new persons, of whose principles, tempers, and dispositions they have little or no experience, and in situations where those who appear the most stirring in the scene may not possibly be the real movers.

-- The Right Hon. Edmund Burke

Turning over the pages of Burke Reflections, the thought is constantly dominant -- even if no other sources of information were at hand -- that the points of similarity between the French Revolution and that which recently occurred in Russia far outnumber those of dissimilarity. The revolutionaries of France were as much adepts at the dissemination of catchwords and slogans as their Russian counterparts of a later day. Some of the rallying cries, as for instance "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity," have persisted in their psychic malfeasance even to the present, and the literature of the French Revolution abounds with phrases which crop out in the wordy exudates of Lenin and Trotsky. The correspondence of Jean Baptiste Carrier† has been recently published, and it is difficult to realize that the scenes of terrible cruelty which Carrier describes are not those in which the central figure is a Dzerzhinsky or a Moghilevsky or that Carrier's loathsome sacrilege is not that of a Bukharin.

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