The Impact of the Human Rights Bill on English Law: The Clifford Chance Lectures - Vol. 3

The Impact of the Human Rights Bill on English Law: The Clifford Chance Lectures - Vol. 3

The Impact of the Human Rights Bill on English Law: The Clifford Chance Lectures - Vol. 3

The Impact of the Human Rights Bill on English Law: The Clifford Chance Lectures - Vol. 3

Synopsis

This year a much anticipated Bill of Rights is to be submitted to the British House of Lords. This work examines the effect such a piece of legislation will have on various aspects of English law, including its potential influence on company and commercial law, freedom of speech, and criminal law.

Excerpt

by ProfessorBasil S. Markesinis QC

This is the third volume of the Clifford Chance Lectures which are organized jointly by the eponymous firm and the Oxford Institute of European Law. The association of the oldest Law Faculty of the land with the largest multinational firm of Solicitors has been forged by the shared belief that academics and practitioners must work closer together in preparing the legal profession for the European, indeed, global challenges which lie ahead. It is appropriate, therefore, to start by thanking, through its Senior Partner Mr Keith Clark, the firm which has assisted in so many ways the work of my Intituted and also allowed us to hold this one-day conference in their splendid London premises. Our thaks also go to Gillian Fletcher for showing academic 'amateurs' how professionals ensure that everything works smoothly from inception all the way through to the great day. Warm thanks are also due to those who took part in the Conference and, with their many and thoughtful questions, made this both a pleasurable and informative occasion. As is so often the case with true professionals, they proved themselves at least as knowledgeable as the speakers.

The aims of the joint organizers of this Conference will be immediately obvious to anyone who reads the list of contributors (and also takes a look at the list of those who canme to our meeting). The first is the need to combine the different perspectives of the academic and the practitioner on the complex problems which face our rapidly changing society. In Britain this was first appreciated by my mentor and friend Professor Roy Goode CBE, QC FBA, who gave effect to this creed by creating his most successful Centre for Commercial Law in the East End of London. On this, the year of his retirement form teaching, it's onl fair that his many friends acknowledge, yet again, their intellectual debts to his innovative mind.

Yet we are not only continuing his pioneering work byt enlarging its scope by adding the European dimension. This is not simply . . .

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