The Custody Wars: Why Children Are Losing the Legal Battle and What We Can Do about It

The Custody Wars: Why Children Are Losing the Legal Battle and What We Can Do about It

The Custody Wars: Why Children Are Losing the Legal Battle and What We Can Do about It

The Custody Wars: Why Children Are Losing the Legal Battle and What We Can Do about It

Synopsis

Drawing on a wealth of legal cases and research -- as well as on the personal stories of families caught in these disputes -- Mary Ann Mason presents a program for reform that is certain to change the terms of the debate on child custody, one of the most highly charged topics on the national agenda.

Excerpt

In the cloakroom of my daughter's Montessori preschool a large chart was posted every week that listed every child's name and who would pick that child up each evening. Many of these children were shuttling back and forth between two households. Every day a good portion of the cubbies were crammed with overstuffed backpacks or small suitcases, and on Fridays the backpacks and suitcases overflowed onto the floor.

With such complicated schedules, there were bound to be slipups. One afternoon I was delayed at work and raced to the school, convinced I would be the last parent to arrive; but one other child was still waiting. He sat tensely on the floor by the door, a large backpack in his lap. My daughter gathered her drawings and jacket and we started out the door. She waved at him and he waved back. He said in a small, worried voice, "Bye Eve, I don't remember who I belong to tonight."

It is not surprising that this child thought of himself as a belonging. Many children are exchanged like chattel between parents who insist on their right to them. Not that these parents don't love their children; they love them more than anyone else.

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