Procrastination: Why You Do It, What to Do about It

Procrastination: Why You Do It, What to Do about It

Procrastination: Why You Do It, What to Do about It

Procrastination: Why You Do It, What to Do about It

Synopsis

If procrastination bothers you, don't let another minute go by without Procrastination. Based on their workshops and counseling, psychologists Jane B. Burka and Lenora M. Yuen offer a probing, sensitive, and sometimes humorous look at a problem that affects everyone: students and scientists, secretaries and executives, homemakers and salespeople. The book starts with the reasons we put off tasks- fears of failure, success, control, separation, and attachment- and their roots in our childhood and adult experiences. In Part II, the authors offer a practical, tested program to overcome procrastination through achieving set goals, managing time, enlisting support, and handling stress. Burka and Yuen even offer tips on living and working with the procrastinators you may know.

Excerpt

People who write books are supposed to be very knowledgeable about their subjects. We know procrastination from the inside out: Between us, we have been through many college all-nighters, spent long years struggling with our doctoral dissertations, paid late tax penalties, and made up elaborate stories to excuse our delays (having to visit a sick grandparent in the hospital is an all-time favorite). We're still marveling that we finished this book only two years after the original dadline! We now optimistically consider ourselves to be "moderately reformed" procrastinators.

In addition to our two lifetimes of personal experience, we have had many years of professional experience working with other procrastinators. We began when we were both on the staff of the Counseling Center at the University of California at Berkeley. In our Procrastination Groups for students we saw patterns and themes emerge again and again. While each individual's struggle was unique, there were many striking similarities among them. We learned, for example, that our plan to start the week off by holding the group on Monday mornings from nine to eleven was completely unrealistic--since no one even showed up until ten o'clock.

When we offered Procrastination Workshops for the general public, we were once again reminded of the nature of the beast. We almost cancelled our first workshop one week before the scheduled date because too few people had registered. In the end, we had to move to a larger room when two-thirds of the group signed up at the last minute.

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