Toward a Socialist America: A Symposium of Essays

Toward a Socialist America: A Symposium of Essays

Toward a Socialist America: A Symposium of Essays

Toward a Socialist America: A Symposium of Essays

Excerpt

From all parts of the world come tidings of the progress being made toward socialism. In one country after another modern economies, that operate from a social base and are governed by social aims, are emerging. The old capitalist systems, pushed to the immediate goals of maximum profit--with incidental, if any consideration of the social costs involvel--are found to be socially inadequate and unworkable.

There is evidence of growing doubt among American working men and women, in all areas of occupation, regarding the efficacy of a capitalist economic system in maintaining high standards of life and labor and the constancy of production for peaceful uses. Faced with uncertain tenure of employment, with debt and, in tragically large numbers, with poverty, workers in industry and agriculture find it increasingly difficult to provide suitable conditions for themselves and their children. And now even greater sacrifices are being asked of them, as the conflict and temperature of the cold war are stepped up.

Small wonder that in industrial plants and on the farms, as well as in college, church, and on the street, questions substantially like these are being asked: Is it not manifestly impossible for the national productive plant to be kept running full tilt, and at inordinately high profits for the few, while the purchasing power of the many steadily declines? Can the American system of monopoly capitalism remain in motion only as long as it is geared to organized obsolescence in its most wasteful form--to a warfare economy and to production and distribution of the tools of human destruction? If not, what is the alternative? May it not be necessary to replace this wasteful and unstable system with one founded on the social ownership, planning and management of production that operates to improve the conditions of living and labor among all the people of the United States and to exchange, with all other nations, of the food, goods and services produced, all for purposes of building an enduring peace?

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