The Fortyninth Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education

The Fortyninth Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education

The Fortyninth Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education

The Fortyninth Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education

Excerpt

The purpose of this yearbook is to focus the relevant data and concepts from the psychology of learning upon the problems of instruction in the elementary and secondary schools. The achievement of this purpose involves four steps: first, stating how learning proceeds as a general psychological process and how children are motivated to learn; second, describing how respective aspects or categories of behavior, such as motor skills or attitudes, are learned; third, pointing out the implications for instruction of accumulated knowledge from the field of learning; and fourth, redefining instruction in terms of the school as a laboratory for learning.

This yearbook will, it is hoped, symbolize the shift in thinking concerning educational method during the last thirty-five years which is reflected in a change of emphasis from "techniques of presenting content" to "directing the learning of the child."

The problem and contribution of the yearbook must be seen in the perspective of the entire problem of education. Perhaps the fundamental development in educational theory of the last fifty years has been the approach through a statement of principles of education. Students of education are attempting to set down the basic principles in the various fields--administration, curriculum, instruction, student personnel work, evaluation, and so on--from which sound practices can be derived and against which they can, in turn, be evaluated. These students of educational theory are evolving such principles in part from a systematic philosophy of education and in part from data that are being accumulated through research on both instructional procedures and the nature of children--how they grow, develop, and learn, and how they differ from one another. The philosophy is in large measure a social one, formulated in the frame of a democratic . . .

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