The Russian Revolution, 1917: Eyewitness Account - Vol. 2

The Russian Revolution, 1917: Eyewitness Account - Vol. 2

The Russian Revolution, 1917: Eyewitness Account - Vol. 2

The Russian Revolution, 1917: Eyewitness Account - Vol. 2

Excerpt

With the birth of the Coalition Government events slowed down and lost their former dizzy speed. However urgently history continued to move forward, the revolution had begun to mark time. Between May and October tremendous events took place, but the phase of the revolution did not change and constituted a single unified period. The line of development was as straight as an arrow. Two attempts to turn it aside interrupted this straight line, but did not change its direction: the revolution quickly and easily returned to its previous course both after the July Days and after the Kornilov putsch.

This evidently means that towards the beginning of May 'political relations' in the revolution were completely crystallized, and had arrived at some sort of stable point. The bloc of the big and petty bourgeoisie was completely stable, unshakeable, and even formal--from the beginning of May until October; and the policy of the united bourgeois front was the suffocation of the proletariat, Zimmerwald, and the entire revolution. It moved along a straight road to liquidation.

This was the obverse side of the Coalition period. The reverse side was simply the enormous growth of discontent amongst the masses of the people, headed by the proletariat of the capital. Worn out by the war, hunger, and chaos, disillusioned by the policy of the Government, thirsting for the fruits of victory--the masses of the people rallied in the struggle for the revolution and prepared themselves for new and decisive battles.

Anyone looking at the policy of the Coalition was also seeing the success of Lenin, for these were two sides of the same medal. And amongst the genuine revolutionaries from the beginning of May on it was already being said: 'Bolshevik mole, you're digging magnificently!'

Soon after the March revolution the whole of the Russian plutocracy was consolidated in the Cadet Party. And the Cadets, while Miliukov was a Minister, were of course a completely . . .

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