Sensationalism and Scientific Explanation

Sensationalism and Scientific Explanation

Sensationalism and Scientific Explanation

Sensationalism and Scientific Explanation

Excerpt

Since the seventeenth century at least, it has been customary to draw a contrast between pure mathematics and the natural sciences on the ground that mathematics has its origins in pure reason while the sciences have theirs in sense-experience. In spite of some opposition this view has survived, and the work of philosophers of science during the last two centuries can be regarded as largely concerned with the understanding and refining of it. One trend in this refining process which has been, and continues to be, exceedingly influential among philosophically minded scientists and empiricist philosophers, might be called 'epistemological atomism'. By this cumbersome title I refer to accounts of science according to which scientific statements can be understood only in terms of basic 'atoms' of experience or 'atomic' experiences, variously called 'sensations', 'sensa', 'sense-data' or, simply, 'experiences'. These are all, to a greater or lesser extent, psychological concepts since all such 'atoms' depend for their alleged existence upon minds.

According to the most extreme form of this view, all . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.