Government Statistics for Business Use

Government Statistics for Business Use

Government Statistics for Business Use

Government Statistics for Business Use

Excerpt

Many phenomenal changes have occurred in the United States since the end of the war. Many of these changes having important implications for business have been measured by the various censuses and current government statistical series that have been conducted since the first edition of this book was published in 1946. Moreover, since 1946, many significant changes have occurred, substantive and procedural, in the statistics made available by the federal government. This revision was undertaken because important portions of the first edition of this work are now outmoded and a continued demand for the book indicates that it is rendering a service to the business community.

This work had its origin in an idea that occurred to Dr. Walter A. Shewhart of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company at a meeting of the Committee on Applied Mathematical Statistics of the National Research Council in January, 1944. During the course of the meeting of this committee, which was also attended by one of us, it became evident that even the leaders of market research activities were unaware of the mine of statistical information available in the federal government for business use. On the basis of this experience, Dr. Shewhart concluded that a book addressed to the business community indicating the major types of data available in the federal government for management, production, and marketing needs would serve a useful purpose.

Since the end of the war, American business has been largely characterized by high levels of activity and growth. Despite the seller's market which has prevailed during most of this period, research activities in business, including marketing research activities, have greatly expanded. In consequence, government agencies have been faced with more demand than ever for current, significant information for business use.

The great importance of statistics to the business community has been manifest in the initiative that business has taken in working with government agencies and with the Congress in efforts to achieve a useful, efficient, and adequate government statistical product. In . . .

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