Economics for Development

Economics for Development

Economics for Development

Economics for Development

Excerpt

The Cold War is not going very well for the western world. Soviet or Chinese influence is infiltrating into many of the undeveloped countries, in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The next twenty-five years may indicate which system of government and economics is going to prevail outside the North Atlantic basin.

There are many reasons for the continual gains of communism. For one thing the Soviets, during several decades, have come near to perfecting their techniques of subversion. They know what issues to exploit both with the masses and with intellectuals. They are masterful in their ability to use perfectly patriotic and well intentioned people for their purposes. And, where not yet in power, they can make extravagant promises of material well being later.

In such an ideological struggle one would think that the countries of North America and Western Europe would have nearly all the advantages. Their own extraordinary prosperity, contrasted with the Soviet Union and Communist China, should be a convincing proof of the superiority of their political and economic systems. Their cultures, techniques, and institutions, if they could only become established in today's poor and backward countries, would provide economic development with personal freedom.

The peoples of the undeveloped countries sense that adopting communism means sacrificing their cultures and losing many freedoms. But perhaps a majority is prepared to suffer these losses in exchange for the rapid economic advance that they now believe can come only through international communism. They know that their countries are barely developing now. Because they do not have state socialism now, many believe that they have already tried the best that private capitalism can offer and have found it wanting.

What they do not realize is that in the main they have never really experienced American-style government and economics. True, there has . . .

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