The Revolution in American Foreign Policy: Its Global Range

The Revolution in American Foreign Policy: Its Global Range

The Revolution in American Foreign Policy: Its Global Range

The Revolution in American Foreign Policy: Its Global Range

Excerpt

International relations are never simple. They are pluralistic, complex, and in constant flux.

American foreign policy today is a combination of various approaches and means: military strength; "power-politics" alliances; collective security in the United Nations; foreign economic aid; social politics (foreign technical assistance and economic aid directed to social and political ends); economic incentives and reprisals; trading policies designed to benefit some nations and injure others; ideological, cultural, and psychological appeals; and many more.

Foreign policy responds to many groups, interests, values, and pressures both at home and abroad. The pressures from abroad come from nations (some friendly, some unfriendly, some of varying shades of neutrality), from revolutionary and counter-revolutionary movements, from alliances, and from regional and international organizations, all of which in turn must respond to internal pressures.

The interests and values, groups and pressures, situations within situations, elements and factors, approaches and means operate simultaneously and continuously. However, the attention paid to a particular pressure, the emphasis given to this or that factor, the extent to which an approach or an instrument is used are constantly shifting as conditions change and influences rise and fall.

The territorial units which have been or are the players--city . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.