Theatre: Essays on the Arts of the Theatre

Theatre: Essays on the Arts of the Theatre

Theatre: Essays on the Arts of the Theatre

Theatre: Essays on the Arts of the Theatre

Excerpt

Whatever else the theatre is in America today, it is alive. It may be good, bad, or indifferent, according to opinion. At any given point on the theatre highways from New York to San Francisco it may be creative and imaginative, mechanical and imitative, or vulgar and of low intention. It may be all of these at different spots in the market place of the theatre, which is Broadway, and it may even, as in "The Follies" or the Winter Garden, be at the same time something of both extremes, at once brilliant and vulgar, beautiful and of undistinguished aim. But by all the laws of growth and vigor, of striking roots and spreading branches through which we judge of other living things, the American theatre is more alive today than the theatre of any other country in the world. Not so mature and not so elegant, perhaps, but far more "up and coming", as the phrase goes. If you watched closely enough, you could, during the last dozen years especially, almost see this theatre grow. First, out from Broadway to Grand Street and MacDougall, out from New York to Cleveland and Dallas, Pasadena and Santa Barbara, out from professional playhouses into little theatres and universities, into the farm lands of Dakota and the mountains of North Carolina, into the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.