Britain and the USA

Britain and the USA

Britain and the USA

Britain and the USA

Excerpt

It is a measure of the intimacy that exists between Britain and the U.S.A. that it does not come naturally to write of British foreign policy in a context where the United States is involved. Yet that is what this book is about, it is not a study of Anglo- American relations, nor yet of British public opinion in relation to the U.S.A.; it is an attempt to describe and analyse the dealings of the British Government with the American Government as they have been affected by the changes wrought by the war and the post-war years. It is not a history, but it is written with a conviction that every post hoc is in some degree a propter hoc; consequently some admixture of historical narrative has been judged indispensable for the analysis. It is highly selective; to write comprehensively of its avowed subject is little less than to write a study of British foreign policy in all its aspects, so many and continuous are the points of contact between the two Governments. Rather than attempt the impossible, I have concentrated on certain topics and areas that seem representative and important, but I am very conscious that it is often a hairbreadth that divides the succinct from the cursory.

Too many kindnesses lie behind the preparation and execution of this book for me to thank all my teachers and benefactors, conscious and unconscious, British and American, here. But I must make mention of my debt to the Leverhulme Foundation and St. Antony's College, Oxford, who inspired it, to the Rockefeller Foundation who encouraged it, and to the John Hopkins University who gave it a most hospitable welcome in its earlier dress as the Albert Shaw Lectures in Diplomatic History for 1961.

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