Personality at the Crossroads: Current Issues in Interactional Psychology

Personality at the Crossroads: Current Issues in Interactional Psychology

Personality at the Crossroads: Current Issues in Interactional Psychology

Personality at the Crossroads: Current Issues in Interactional Psychology

Excerpt

It is not surprising that there should be an international symposium on person by situation interaction. What is puzzling is that the first symposium on this issue did not take place until 1975.

The notion that the sources of behavior were not to be sought only within the individual, but in his interaction with his environment was formulated by theorists in psychology as early as the 1920's and the 1930's. These early theories, however, did not lead to two expected consequences, namely, empirical research on the person by situation issue, and the formulation of an integrated theory for the person by situation interaction process, until the 1960's and 1970's. During the last fifteen years there has been a proliferation of empirical studies that have developed almost independently of the earlier theoretical formulations. (See for example the recently edited book by Endler andMagnusson Interactional Psychology and Personality). The results of these studies have initiated a theoretical debate that has raised new issues. At present many investigators are involved in both empirical research and theoretical discussions regarding the person by situation interaction issue. For these reasons, we felt that a symposium at which active researchers would discuss the crucial problems of personality models and effective research strategies would be fruitful. Such a symposium, on Interactional Psychology, was organized (by David Magnusson and Norman S. Endler) and took place in Stockholm, Sweden, June 22-27, 1975.

All 28 papers presented at the symposium are included in this book. In addition, the introductory chapter (Chapter 1), which constitutes Part I, was written especially for this book by the editors. The 28 symposium papers (Chapters 2-29), which were revised following the symposium, are organized into four parts (Parts II-V).

The main aims of the introductory chapter are (1) to discuss certain conceptual distinctions that we think are essential for future research and theory, and (2) to . . .

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