Argumentation, Discussion, and Debate

Argumentation, Discussion, and Debate

Argumentation, Discussion, and Debate

Argumentation, Discussion, and Debate

Excerpt

In the past twenty-four hours you have probably engaged in considerable talking. In the classroom, on the campus, and elsewhere your oral exchange has continued. Much of your conversation has, no doubt, been pointless; some of it has been organized speaking before your fraternity or other group.

No small part of your vocal output has been argumentative or persuasive.

In addition to this routine campus experience, you may be trying out for a debate team, or. joining a student discussion squad, or having an eye on radio discussion. Moreover you have enrolled in a course in argumentation, or discussion, or debate.

Just why? Perhaps some student advised you to sign up. Whatever your motive, you will later (if you do not at the outset) come to understand the broad values of training and development as an arguer, debater, and discussant.

College presidents, lawyers, teachers, engineers, journalists, radio commentators, preachers, community leaders, salesmen, professional men and women of all sorts have repeatedly told how much their experience in discussion and debate has helped.

A Middle Western college president and former Rhodes scholar . . .

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