Alaska in Transition: the Southeast Region

Alaska in Transition: the Southeast Region

Alaska in Transition: the Southeast Region

Alaska in Transition: the Southeast Region

Excerpt

For many years Alaska has attracted prospectors, fishermen, fliers, tourists, scientists, artists and writers, and certain other "Outsiders," as Alaskans have called those living in the first forty-eight states. A few of them have remained -- quite a few since the end of the Second World War. But now with admission to statehood as the forty-ninth state an accomplished fact, interest in Alaska has become general. Films, TV programs, popular magazines as well as professional journals have featured various aspects of Alaskan life. Representatives of New York financial houses have gone tip to look the situation over. National politicians have taken to the stump there. And groups favoring one form of policy over another have shifted their sights from Washington to Juneau.

For all this excitement the difference statehood may make for economic development in Alaska is uncertain and will have to remain so for a while. To appraise its impact, and the impact of other notable recent events such as the postwar population boom (Alaska has been growing faster than any other state), the enormous military security investments in the DEW line and other installations, the creation of a pulp industry, and the discovery of oil fields, one had better take the time to look long and deeply into the trends and problems of natural resources, labor force (both white and native), transportation, sources of investment funds, and government regulation. And because Alaska is so large (more than twice the size of Texas and extending east to west as far as from South Carolina to California) and so diverse, the significant regions within the new state have to be examined, as well as the whole.

In this study George W. Rogers has focused on southeast Alaska, the panhandle archipelago stretching some 400 miles southeastward from the main body of Alaska forming as it . . .

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