Sex Differences and Similarities in Communication: Critical Essays and Empirical Investigations of Sex and Gender in Interaction

Synopsis

Men and women differ, to be sure, and numerous academic and lay books have exploited those differences. This book does not presume that sex and gender differences occur in all communication between people. Rather, it explores where and when such differences occur. In other words, it examines sex differences in the way that men and women communicate within the context of sex similarities, and attempts to present a balanced approach to the topic.

Many books explore sex differences by examining power issues or the communication of intimacy. This volume explores both tendencies to control and to express oneself for purposes of intimacy. The wide range of topics discussed will appeal to everyone interested in sex differences -- those who examine issues of control as well as issues surrounding intimacy.

This book offers a blend of theoretical statements and empirical studies. That is, some chapters deal exclusively with expanding understanding of sex differences in communication, whereas other chapters investigate timely issues in reports of original research. The range of topics the contributors explore is substantial, and their essays are grouped according to two familiar dimensions of interaction: affect and control.

The book opens with a debate about the degree to which men and women are different. It then offers more abstract and theoretical discussions about where sex differences and similarities reside. The volume concludes with several specific empirical investigations of important research issues.

Additional information

Includes content by:
  • Kathryn Dindia
  • Julia T. Wood
  • Paul H. Wright
  • Elizabeth Aries
  • Peter A. Andersen
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Mahwah, NJ
Publication year:
  • 1998