Broadening the Horizons of Chinese History: Discourses, Syntheses, and Comparisons

Broadening the Horizons of Chinese History: Discourses, Syntheses, and Comparisons

Broadening the Horizons of Chinese History: Discourses, Syntheses, and Comparisons

Broadening the Horizons of Chinese History: Discourses, Syntheses, and Comparisons

Synopsis

Gathered here are research papers, speeches, and lecture notes, a multifaceted survey of Chinese history embracing a wide range of subjects, from historical antecedents, relevant Western experience, and recent revelations to locus classicus and statistics. All lead to Huang's grand synthesis: That the one-and-a-half-century-long Chinese revolution is nearing fulfillment as Chinese civilization merges with Western history. While not everyone will agree with Ray Huang, no one who is seriously concerned with these issues can afford to ignore the provocative and erudite challenge of his vision.

Excerpt

Time changes, and lately at an accelerated pace. The dawn of the present century saw Marconi still toying with transoceanic signals, and the Wright brothers managing to float in the air for no more than several hundred yards. Now, less than a hundred years later, long-distance travel by air is commonplace and FAX machines have become essential to home offices. Circumstances compel historians to work overtime. If we hesitate, chances are that our fresh ideas, even before being proofread, will be overtaken by events.

Some fifteen years ago, when I, for the first time, indicated that the protracted revolution in China is about to come to a fruitful conclusion, I received a mild reprimand from certain critics who felt that I was making a hasty statement. Today I would say that, on balance, the risk stemming from timidity far exceeds that coming out of audaciousness, so far as Chinese history is concerned.

In retrospect, the violent struggle in China in this passing century can be connected to the rapid advancement of technology in the outside world; it exerted an unbearable pressure on that country; overnight she discovered that she had to restructure herself in order to survive. At the conclusion of World War II Theodore White wrote: "China must change or die." The present volume testifies in support of his assertion.

The story can be worked out elaborately or presented summarily. The application of modern technology, in terms of jet liners and FAX machines and so forth, is hinged on an efficient economic workhorse. Capitalism might be an abused word; but, regardless, at this moment it seems that its most prominent feature is not class struggle, but deficit financing. The nation's resources must be utilized to the full to sustain the industrial growth. Based on Western experience, the application of such a system had to be inclusive and exclusive, encompassing both . . .

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