Cognitive Science and Concepts of Mind: Toward a General Theory of Human and Artificial Intelligence

Cognitive Science and Concepts of Mind: Toward a General Theory of Human and Artificial Intelligence

Cognitive Science and Concepts of Mind: Toward a General Theory of Human and Artificial Intelligence

Cognitive Science and Concepts of Mind: Toward a General Theory of Human and Artificial Intelligence

Synopsis

For all of recorded history prior to the second half of the twentieth century, there has been but one realm in which the cognitive processes of reasoning and problem solving, learning and discovery, language and mathematics took place. The realm of human intellect no longer has an exclusive claim on these cognitive processes--artificial intelligence represents a parallel claim. Wagman compares the two realms, focusing on each of the major components of cognition: logic, reasoning, problem-solving, language, memory, learning, and discovery. He identifies consonant and disparate modes of cognition, and develops a general theory of human and artificial intelligence.

Excerpt

Analysis of the nature of human intellect has paralleled the course of human civilization. Theories of intellect have been advanced by the classical Greek philosophers, the medieval scholastics, the modern European, British, and U.S. empiricists and rationalists. This traditional analysis can now be enriched by the development of artificial intelligence, a new form of intellect.

The domain of artificial intelligence invites a reexamination of the domain of human intelligence. These domains may be characterized by consonant or disparate theories of intellect. the intercomparison of the two domains can result in a more comprehensive and more explicit general theory of intellect.

A general theory of intellect entails the specific components of intellect as conceptualized in the domains of human and artificial intelligence. These specific components include the conceptual areas of reasoning, language, learning, and discovery. Theories of these components of intellect as well as problem solving, logic, and memory are systematically examined and compared.

Following the introductory chapter, each succeeding chapter focuses on a major component of cognition. Each cognitive component (logic, reasoning, problem solving, language, memory, learning, discovery) is analyzed from the perspectives of human intellect and artificial intelligence. the dual perspectives are then compared. the analyses and the comparisons take account of basic theory and describe contemporary research. the technical theory and research is considered against a broad background of intellectual history and psychological implication.

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