Infant Development: Perspectives from German-Speaking Countries

Infant Development: Perspectives from German-Speaking Countries

Infant Development: Perspectives from German-Speaking Countries

Infant Development: Perspectives from German-Speaking Countries

Synopsis

Most German-speaking researchers in the area of infant development are familiar with the research conducted in English. However, most English-speaking researchers are relatively unaware of the work currently being done in German. This volume is designed to remedy this imbalance and to promote international collaboration.

The book's contributors -- an exciting and innovative group of German-speaking scholars -- provide up-to-date summaries of theoretical, methodological, and empirical perspectives on development. They review evidence and present points of view of great interest to all people who are committed to furthering our collective understanding of development in infancy.

Excerpt

This volume had its origins in the Spring of 1988 when Heidi Keller was a Visiting Scientist at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Washington. At the time, Heidi was completing work on the first handbook of infant development to be written in German almost exclusively by German contributors. Reviewing the chapters and the table of contents together, we became aware of how little Michael Lamb and his English-speaking colleagues knew of the research programs, research traditions, and theoretical perspectives that had emerged and developed in Europe. We decided, therefore, to edit a volume in which German-speaking scientists might summarize their research programs for English-speaking colleagues who were unable to read the original publications in German. This volume is the result. Some of the chapters are based on contributions to Keller Handbuch der Kleinkindforschung (Handbook of Infant Development), which was published in 1989. Others were commissioned especially for this volume with the express purpose of introducing some of the most creative German scientists to English-speaking readers. All chapters were prepared or revised with this goal in mind, and all were reviewed by translators and bilingual psychologists in order to maximize the clarity of the reports while remaining as true as possible to the authors' styles and expressive desires. Many assistants played a role in this endeavor, but we must offer special thanks to Stephanie Posner, who spent the summer of 1990 reviewing and rewriting several of the chapters for this book. Without her capable and cheerful assistance, its publication simply would not have been possible.

When we began work on this project, the German-speaking countries of Central Europe included East and West Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. We were at the time proud of the relationships we had developed with colleagues in . . .

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