Toward a Scientific Practice of Science Education

Toward a Scientific Practice of Science Education

Toward a Scientific Practice of Science Education

Toward a Scientific Practice of Science Education

Synopsis

This volume supports the belief that a revised and advanced science education can emerge from the convergence and synthesis of several current scientific and technological activities including examples of research from cognitive science, social science, and other discipline-based educational studies. The anticipated result: the formation of science education as an integrated discipline.

Excerpt

James G. Greeno Stanford University and Institute for Research on Learning

Marjorie Gardner Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley

This book reflects a vision of a field that is in the process of development. We believe that a revised and advanced field of science education can emerge from the convergence and synthesis of several current scientific and technological activities. This book includes some examples of research progress of the kind that we hope will form the integrated discipline of science education.

The papers in this volume were presented at a conference that was an effort toward this revision and advancement. At a previous meeting in 1986, members of the communities of science educators, cognitive scientists, and educational technologists met to discuss and formulate a research agenda for science education. in addition to a report of the group's conclusions (Linn, 1987), the meeting accomplished a step toward forming an inclusive community of research and development for science education.

The participants in the 1986 meeting agreed that there is an important agenda for research in science education and that the communities of science educators, science-education researchers, cognitive scientists, and technologists bring important perspectives and capabilities to that scientific activity. They did not completely agree on every point that should be on the agenda or on the relative importance of the points, but that is as it should be. the community should not try to work in a single-minded way, but rather should pursue a collection of overlapping but nonidentical goals and thereby discover which directions are most productive. the shared sense of the group, however, was that important programs of research and development are being pursued, and that some of the community's effort should be directed toward bringing these various activities into closer contact. This led to our decision, along with our colleagues, to hold a conference in 1988, at which the papers in this volume were presented. We . . .

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