German Professions, 1800-1950

German Professions, 1800-1950

German Professions, 1800-1950

German Professions, 1800-1950

Synopsis

The role of the middle class in national development has always been of interest to historians concerned with the "peculiarities" of German history. Recently, the professional sector of the German middle class has come under historical scrutiny as part of a re-examination of those features of German society common to Western industrializing nations. This work provides comprehensive coverage of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Germany from the point of view of this new field. The contributors discuss the formation and development of such diverse professions as law, medicine, teaching, engineering, social work, and psychology, as well as the special cases of the bureaucracy and the military. They examine such questions as the role of the state in the creation and regulation of professions, the social and political role of various professional groups during the turbulent Weimar and Nazi periods, and the remarkable and troubling institutional continuity of certain professions through the Third Reich and into the postwar republics.

Excerpt

This collection originated at the 1985 German Studies Association meeting in Arlington, Virginia. Animated discussions between panelists and audience revealed that the history of the German professions was beginning to arouse considerable interest among scholars who had undertaken to study a wide variety of academic callings from 1800 to the present. Although the idea of compiling this work came independently to the editors, collaboration was an obvious and happy option. Starting with the Arlington papers, we added essays by other American scholars and some continental colleagues so as to produce a representative survey of current work on the German professions. A natural division of labor developed, with Konrad Jarausch providing a conceptual and historical overview, while assuming responsibility for part I, and Geoffrey Cocks contributing an essay to and overseeing part II. At the outset, we would also like to note our gratitude for Charles McClelland's counsel, Geoff Eley's encouragement, and Jay Baird's hospitality.

Albion, Mich. G. C.
Chapel Hill, N.C K. H. J.
June 1989 . . .

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