The Grief of God: Images of the Suffering Jesus in Late Medieval England

The Grief of God: Images of the Suffering Jesus in Late Medieval England

The Grief of God: Images of the Suffering Jesus in Late Medieval England

The Grief of God: Images of the Suffering Jesus in Late Medieval England

Synopsis

Graphic portrayals of the suffering Jesus Christ pervade late medieval English art, literature, drama, and theology. These images have been interpreted as signs of a new emphasis on the humanity of Jesus. To others they indicate a fascination with a terrifying God of vengeance and a morbid obsession with death. In The Grief of God, however, Ellen Ross offers a different understanding of the purpose of this imagery and its meaning to the people of the time. Analyzing a wide range of textual and pictorial evidence, the author finds that the bleeding flesh of the wounded Savior manifests divine presence; in the intensified corporeality of the suffering Jesus whose flesh not only condemns, but also nurtures, heals, and feeds, believers meet a trinitarian God of mercy. Ross explores the rhetoric of transformation common to English medieval artistic, literary, and devotional sources. The extravagant depictions of pain and anguish, the author shows, constitute an urgent appeal to respond to Jesus' expression of love. She also explains how the inscribing of Christ's pain on the bodies of believers at times erased the boundaries between human and divine so that holy persons, and in particular, holy women, participated in the transformative power of Christ. In analyzing the dialects of mercy and justice; the construction of sacred space and time; sacraments and ritual celebration, social action, and divine judgment; and the dynamics of women's public religious authority, this study of religion and culture explores the meaning of the late medieval Christian affirmation that God bled and wept and suffered on the cross to draw persons to Godself. This interdisciplinary study of sermon literature, manuscript illuminations and church wall paintings, drama, hagiographic narratives, and spiritual treaties illuminates the religious sensibilities, practices, and beliefs that constellate around the late medieval fascination with the bleeding body of the suffering Jesus Christ.

Excerpt

For the medieval Christians considered in this book, the blood flowing from the wounds of Jesus Christ is the love of God literally poured out onto all humankind. Divine compassion rains down upon humanity in the shedding of Jesus Christ's blood, and viewers are invited, as The Prickynge of Love expresses it, to enter into the joy of the Godhead through the bloody wounds of Jesus' flesh. Drawing on artistic, literary, and devotional sources in late medieval England, I explore the transformative power of Jesus' wounded body as it manifests divine presence and love in the world.

The Crucifixion was not an event of the past for the authors and artists considered here; rather, it was a living sign of God's merciful love for humanity. I analyze how medieval persons were brought to new understandings of their relationship to God and to neighbor by encountering the bleeding flesh of the wounded Jesus. I further examine the lived, performative spiritualities by which believers imitated the suffering of Jesus. The spiritual authority gained by imitating the enfleshed God -- through sacramental life, prayers for the dead, liturgical role-playing, and even christological self-wounding -- enabled medieval Christians to function as powerful advocates for those who were seeking divine mercy.

My study explores the theological complexity and emotional sophistication of medieval piety. My concern is not with medieval theology per se but with analyzing the religious and cultural dimensions of medieval portrayals of the . . .

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