George Bernard Shaw: Creative Artist

George Bernard Shaw: Creative Artist

George Bernard Shaw: Creative Artist

George Bernard Shaw: Creative Artist

Excerpt

Not so many years ago it was the fashion to disparage Bernard Shaw: even while he was still alive, many of the ideas which had appeared to be so daring when he wrote about them had come to seem antiquated, and since his characters were usually the embodiment of those ideas (or of contemporary oppositions to them), they too appeared to be dated. Yet Shaw's plays have flourished in the theater, and several of them even made excellent films. At present Shaw looms as one of the important literary figures of the age.

Even some of his comedies which have not always been considered first rate do fairly well today. Take the case of Too True to be Good, which was something of a flop in England in 1932 and has been only occasionally revived since. Stanley Weintraub, editor of the Shaw Review, spoke highly of that play in his "dual biography" of Shaw and T. E. Lawrence, Private Shaw and Public Shaw, and just at the time that this book appeared in America (spring 1963), Too True to be Good was resurrected in New York with a star cast. Unlike so many plays that last only a few nights on a Broadway debased by the prevalence of musical-comedy junk, Too True to be Good survived the coolness of various critics and did very well in terms of its originally announced limited engagement.

Of course a good deal of the interest in the production arose from the fact that the character of Private Meek (played in New York by David Wayne) was based on . . .

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