Studies in Eighteenth Century Islamic History

Studies in Eighteenth Century Islamic History

Studies in Eighteenth Century Islamic History

Studies in Eighteenth Century Islamic History

Synopsis

Interdisciplinary in conception, this cooperative study by the world's leading Islamists consists of sixteen chapters and three general introductions tracing in historical perspective the administrative, economic, and cultural aspects of various regions of the Ottoman Empire as well as the overall structure of the Empire itself. A complete glossary of Arabic, Turkish, and Persian terms is provided, as well as a bibliography of major works in European and non-European languages. More than forty photographs illustrate changing tastes in Islamic architecture and art. The fourth in a series of biennial colloquia sponsored by and published as Papers on Islamic History, under the auspices of the Near Eastern History Group, Oxford, and the Middle East Center, University of Pennsylvania.

Excerpt

This is the fourth volume in the series Papers on Islamic History, the result of a succession of international research colloquiums held biennially since the summer of 1965, when the first was organized by the Oxford "Near Eastern History Group," an informal association of scholars concerned with Islamic history. By the time the second colloquium was held at All Souls College in the summer of 1967, the Middle East Center of the University of Pennsylvania had joined the Oxford group in its organization and sponsorship. The partnership has continued: the third colloquium was held in 1969 at All Souls and the fourth, from which the present work emerged, was held at the University of Pennsylvania in 1971. As with this volume, the titles of the published works reflect the subject of each colloquium: The Islamic City, Islam and the Trade of Asia, and Islamic Civilization 950-1150. The fifth colloquium was held at Oxford in July, 1975 and concerned itself with the formative period of Islamic history, A.D. 650800.

The colloquiums try to achieve these purposes: to focus the interest of scholars on areas of Islamic history and civilization which are considered to have been neglected or to be in need of fresh study and interpretation; to encourage and promote the work of younger scholars in various branches of Middle Eastern studies by enabling them to associate closely with more experienced colleagues in the same and collateral fields; and to publish the papers of the colloquiums. It is a basic policy that scholars from both the Middle East and the Western world participate jointly in the endeavor to achieve these aims.

This colloquium on the eighteenth century was made possible by financial contributions from several benefactors: the Division of International Education of the United States Office of Education, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Anspach Institute of Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs of the University of Pennsylvania were all most generous. The organizers and participants express their warm gratitude to these sponsors. To the students, faculty and secretaries of . . .

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