The Golden Tapestry: A Critical Survey of Non-Chivalric Spanish Fiction in English Translation, 1543-1657

The Golden Tapestry: A Critical Survey of Non-Chivalric Spanish Fiction in English Translation, 1543-1657

The Golden Tapestry: A Critical Survey of Non-Chivalric Spanish Fiction in English Translation, 1543-1657

The Golden Tapestry: A Critical Survey of Non-Chivalric Spanish Fiction in English Translation, 1543-1657

Excerpt

I should like to direct my first prefatory words to those who dislike fancy titles. Although I admit a leaning toward phrases which stimulate the imagination, the present book, in order not to confuse booksellers, cataloguers, and potential readers, was for some time destined to have a factual label, but only until it was discovered that no accurate label was brief enough. (The present subtitle is evidence.) Hence the extravagance.

As a glance at the book soon reveals, it lacks a general bibliography. Realizing that I could not possibly hope to record all of my debts, I have settled for moderately complete documentation in the footnotes. This at least has the advantage of juxtaposing a number of valuable commentaries and the various subjects on which they have proved helpful to me. It has the disadvantages of overemphasizing the value of some works, of minimizing the value of certain others, and of leading to the omission of still others. The virtual omission, for instance, of A List of English Tales and Prose Romances Printed before 1740 (London, 1912), byArundell Esdaile, is not an oversight but an implicit acknowledgment that the ground covered by this pioneer and relevant to my own work has now been re-surveyed by Charles C. Mish in his much more recent English Prose Fiction (Charlottesville, Va., 1952).

It seems best to say a word, too, on the editions of the many narratives I discuss. I have tried to work always from first editions or microfilms of first editions, failing sometimes, of course, as when it came to the first Lazarillo or, more strangely, to Lope Pilgrime of Casteele. It follows that my debt to librarians is unusually great.

Among the many librarians to whom I am indebted are Miss Florence E. Blakely and her staff at the Duke University Library, Mrs. Flora D. Colton at the University of Pennsylvania Library, and Miss Dorothy E. Mason and her staff at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Among libraries extending special courtesies are the British Museum, the Bodleian Library, the Library of Congress, the Libraries of Harvard University, the Huntington Library, and the libraries of Sion College, Dulwich College, Worcester College (Oxford), and the Société Jersiaise.

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