Later Greek Sculpture: And Its Influence on East and West

Later Greek Sculpture: And Its Influence on East and West

Later Greek Sculpture: And Its Influence on East and West

Later Greek Sculpture: And Its Influence on East and West

Excerpt

Although sculpture of the transition from Greek to Roman times reached a high level (of which such relics as the Dying Gaul and the Venus of Milo have long testified), although too it possesses unusual historical value from its influence in subsequent centuries throughout Asia as well as within the Roman Empire, yet few scholars could trace the lines of its development, some of their essays on the period are noticeably out of date, while the others are concerned with problems rather than established facts, being addressed to archæologists only. Classical students have, in fact, worked more upon earlier sculpture, with the result that no attempt has been made to index the vast literature on later objects that lies scattered among learned publications. In the hope that the present book may serve both ordinary readers and specialists, I have cleared the text of controversy and provided an Appendix to absorb dull matter; the text mentions few works that are not illustrated in the Plates, but the Appendix gives a list of the important sculptures of the period arranged according to their probable dates. In most cases reasons for so dating them have already been stated in articles to which reference is made, and to avoid unduly . . .

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