D. H. Lawrence: A First Study

D. H. Lawrence: A First Study

D. H. Lawrence: A First Study

D. H. Lawrence: A First Study

Excerpt

Lawrence died on the 3rd of March, 1930, when these pages were in proof. Although what I have written deals largely with the autobiographical side of his work, the book is not a biography but a comment on certain aspects of his writings, so that with the exception of this opening paragraph and the closing lines I have made no alteration. It has been impossible to obey the impulse to cut out some of the less essential criticisms which in the realisation of the fact of his death have seemed half irrelevant.

I call this book a first study for two reasons. First because it seems strange that although he has been the subject of so many references, often important, from writers as far apart as Wyndham Lewis and Middleton Murry, E. M. Forster and T. S. Eliot, Arnold Bennett and the reviewers of the New Statesman, yet there has been, so far, no book published in England with D. H. Lawrence as its main subject. Perhaps it is that those who think him bad think him so bad as not to be worth writing about, and those who think him good think him so good that the fear of unworthiness goes the other way. The greater part of Lawrence's public however comes from neither of these two classes. The majority of his readers are youngish, normally educated, somewhat conventional men who, attracted by hearsay knowledge of Lawrence as a breaker down of estab-

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