Symbolic Logic

Symbolic Logic

Symbolic Logic

Symbolic Logic

Excerpt

I have so fully explained the nature and aim of this system of Logic, in the Introduction, that nothing further need be said on this head. The substance of most of these chapters has been given in my college lectures, our present intercollegiate scheme of lecturing (now in operation for about twelve years) offering great facilities for the prosecution of any special studies which happen to suit the taste and capacity of some particular lecturer and a selection of the students. I mention this in order to explain what might seem a disproportionate devotion of time to one peculiar development of Logic.

Besides Mr C. J. Monro, who has repeated the kind help he gave on a former occasion, I have to thank several friends and fellow-lecturers (amongst whom I must mention Mr H. Sidgwick, Mr H. S. Foxwell, Mr J. Ward, and Mr J. N. Keynes, before whom several of these chapters were read and discussed) for many valuable suggestions and criticisms. I must also express my obligations to Prof. G. Croom Robertson, of University College, London, for his kindness in procuring me several rare works from the valuable library of his college.

I should add here that the substance of some of the following chapters has already appeared elsewhere: viz. Chap. I in Mind (July, 1880), Chap. V in the Philosophical Magazine (July, 1880), and Chap. XX in the Proc. of the Cambridge Philosophical Society (Dec., 1880), but all of these have been rewritten and enlarged. The general view adopted in this work was sketched out in an article in the Princeton Review of September, 1880.

CAMBRIDGE,
April 7, 1881.

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