National Resources and Foreign Aid: Report of J.A. Krug, Secretary of the Interior

National Resources and Foreign Aid: Report of J.A. Krug, Secretary of the Interior

National Resources and Foreign Aid: Report of J.A. Krug, Secretary of the Interior

National Resources and Foreign Aid: Report of J.A. Krug, Secretary of the Interior

Excerpt

As I have reflected on the substance of this report, I am more than ever impressed with the extraordinary difficulty of viewing the problems of national resources and foreign aid in proper perspective.

Our exports are a relatively small proportion of the total output of our economy and one might be tempted to dismiss lightly their effect on our resources. On the other hand, scarce supply and high prices are part of our everyday experience. And the need for the conservation of our raw material resources is greater than ever before. Demands arising from a foreign-aid program, even though they did not increase current levels of exports, would aggravate in some measure the strains on our economy, which is currently operating at highest peacetime levels and, in many instances, is exceeding wartime peaks.

It is self-evident that even a country as wealthy in resources as the United States cannot long underwrite the material deficits of other nations without serious impacts upon its economy and its resources. But we know from our war experience that the limits of what our economy can do are exceedingly elastic, that it has great flexibility and strength, and that resources are not fixed and immutable but are subject to constant changes in technology and in production and consumption patterns. We know that what we as a nation can do depends in great measure upon what we set out to do.

A program of foreign aid must, therefore, be weighed . . .

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