Fifty Years of Botany: Golden Jubilee Volume of the Botanical Society of America

Fifty Years of Botany: Golden Jubilee Volume of the Botanical Society of America

Fifty Years of Botany: Golden Jubilee Volume of the Botanical Society of America

Fifty Years of Botany: Golden Jubilee Volume of the Botanical Society of America

Excerpt

This book has resulted from the cooperative efforts of many different individuals. In September, 1955, the Council of the Botanical Society of America and the members present at the annual business meeting voted to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Society in 1956 by the publication of a Golden Jubilee Volume of the American Journal of Botany. It was also decided that special invitational papers of broad and general interest should be included in as many issues as possible and that these invited contributions should be brought together and published as a separate, bound, repaged volume. The 1956 volume (43) of the American Journal of Botany was officially designated as the Golden Jubilee Volume, and each issue was unmistakably identified by a special caption and by a golden cover. Most of the forty papers that compose this book appeared as Special Papers in Volumes 43 and 44 of the American Journal of Botany.

The Golden Jubilee Volume Committee of the Botanical Society of America was appointed in November, 1955, and charged by the President of the Society, Professor Oswald Tippo, with the responsibility of selecting authors to represent the various fields of plant science and of inviting them to present contributions on the major advances or important developments in botany during the past fifty years, with emphasis on present trends and future problems and on the contribution of plant science to mankind and to his civilization. The Committee, consisting of George Beadle, John Behnke, Vernon I. Cheadle, Edmund H. Fulling, David Goddard, C. J. Hylander, Oswald Tippo, and William C. Steere, Chairman, hopes that in addition to its value and interest to plant scientists, this volume will enable intelligent nonbotanists to understand and to appreciate what botany is and what botanists are doing.

Reminiscent of the facetious definition of a camel as "an animal that looks like something designed by a committee," a book written by forty authors -- and designed by a committee -- very naturally tends to lack uniformity of style and treatment. The papers included in this volume differ as widely as the nature of the authors themselves and vary from rather general surveys to the presentation of the results of original research. The coverage of the whole field of plant science is not as complete as the Committee had planned . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.