Canada and Her Great Neighbor: Sociological Surveys of Opinions and Attitudes in Canada concerning the United States

Canada and Her Great Neighbor: Sociological Surveys of Opinions and Attitudes in Canada concerning the United States

Canada and Her Great Neighbor: Sociological Surveys of Opinions and Attitudes in Canada concerning the United States

Canada and Her Great Neighbor: Sociological Surveys of Opinions and Attitudes in Canada concerning the United States

Excerpt

It is rather more than two years since the material in this book was first prepared for publication. Much that is significant for its purposes has taken place during this interval. In the great world the League of Nations has failed to preserve the territorial integrity of Abyssinia, and has shown itself impotent to deal with warfare in Spain and in the Far East. Within the British Empire a king has died, a king has abdicated and a king has been crowned. Within the United States, Mr. Roosevelt has been elected for a second term in which he has encountered severe political opposition within his own party. In Canada a Liberal government is in power and the attempt of its predecessor to enlarge the legislative power of the federal government has been defeated by the courts. As between the United States and Canada a trade agreement has come into operation. In other matters, too, there has been change. I am told that the American motion pictures no longer justify (if indeed they ever did) much of the criticism which has been recorded in these pages. While it has been possible here and there to correct statements which are no longer true and to mention events which have occurred in the interval, it is inevitable that, at the moment of publication, the book should be less up to date than had been hoped.

It is a matter of opinion--or of guess-work--whether or not any of these developments, or all of them together, mark a turning point in Canadian opinion, and the beginning of some new trend. Personally I do not think that there is sufficient evidence for believing that they do. But it is beyond question that this book was written at a time when feeling towards the United States was less cordial than it is today. I am inclined to think that it has passed from a phase of slight uncordiality to one of abnormal cordiality and that, as in economic matters, we must expect cyclical movements rather than smooth progression.

Something must be said of the changes which have been made in the book itself during the last two years. These have not been extensive but some of the more extreme and irresponsible criticisms of the United States have been omitted altogether and some other . . .

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