American Industry in War: A Report of the War Industries Board (March 1921)

American Industry in War: A Report of the War Industries Board (March 1921)

American Industry in War: A Report of the War Industries Board (March 1921)

American Industry in War: A Report of the War Industries Board (March 1921)

Excerpt

This is a timely and valuable compilation of the writings of B. M. Baruch on industrial mobilization for war, a subject to the study of which he has devoted most of his spare time for many years--and almost all of his time in recent years. As the director and genius of our trail-blazing organization along these lines in World War I, he had a more intense experience with these principles than any other living man --and it was successful. This pioneer work created a pattern of organization and method for war-regulation of industry which both the Germans and the British have acknowledged and adopted as far as it is adaptable to their systems.

At the close of the First World War, this work was applauded by nearly all the great war leaders--Woodrow Wilson, Lloyd George, Winston Churchill, Clemenceau, Hindenburg, Ludendorff, and Pershing, to name only a few. Year after year since then, Mr. Baruch has collaborated, lectured, or advised with the War College, the Industrial College, and the General Staff of the Army, with Committees of Congress, in the press, and at civilian colleges, to try to help keep the economics of the Industrial Mobilization plan of the Army alive and adaptable to the changing circumstances of a world in almost constant turmoil.

In 1935, partly inspired perhaps by his close contacts with European statesmen and especially with Mr. Winston Churchill, Mr. Baruch became very much alarmed at the rapid rise of Nazi military and air power, at the apparent indifference to this growing danger in France, in England, and in the even more directly theatened small states of Europe. He was especially disturbed by the almost complete nonchalance of our government and the comparative helplessness of our own Army in numbers, equipment, organization, and training to compete with the kind of armament that he knew was proceeding so rapidly in Europe.

Continuously afterward, and with increasing insistence as the tragic world situation developed in the awful direction of the 1940 holocaust . . .

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