Formal Grammar: Theory and Implementation

Formal Grammar: Theory and Implementation

Formal Grammar: Theory and Implementation

Formal Grammar: Theory and Implementation

Synopsis

1. Learnability of Phrase Structure Grammars, J.D. Fodor Comment, J.M. Gawron 2. Dynamic Categorial Grammar, R.T. Oehrle Comment, P. Jacobson 3. Categorial Grammars, Lexical Rules, and the English Predicative, B. Carpenter 4. Implementing Government Binding Theories, E.P. Stabler, Jr. Comment, V. Dahl 5. A Learning Model for a Parametric Theory in Phonology, B.E. Dresher Comment, K. Church 6. Some Choices in the Theory of Morphology, A.M. Zwickey 7. Semantics, Knowledge, and NP Modification, S. Crain and H. Hamburger 8. On the Development of Biologically Real Models of Human Linguistic Capacity, M.-L. Kean 9. Properties of Lexical Entries and Their Real-Time Implementation, L.P. Shapiro

Excerpt

This volume is an outgrowth of the second conference, held in February 1989, in a series of conferences hosted by the Cognitive Science Programme of Simon Fraser University and devoted to the exploration of issues in cognition and the nature of mental representations. The conference theme was "Formal Grammar: Theory and Implementation," and followed what has become the standard format of the SFU Cognitive Science conferences: six main speakers (Elan Dresher, Mary-Louise Kean, Richard Oehrle, Ivan Sag, Edward Stabler, and Arnold Zwicky), each paired with a commentator (respectively, Kenneth Church, Lewis Shapiro, Pauline Jacobson, Janet Dean Fodor, Verónica Dahl, and Martin Kay). Of these presentations, all but the contributions of Sag and Kay are represented in this volume, along with invited papers by Robert Carpenter, Stephen Crain and Henry Hamburger, and Mark Gawron; they reflect work in phonology (Dresher, Church), morphology (Zwicky), semantics (Crain and Hamburger), neurolinguistics (Kean, Shapiro), and syntax (Fodor, Gawron; Oehrle, Jacobson; Carpenter; Stabler, Dahl). The notion of implementation was construed rather broadly in assembling the conference program, embracing not only machine-based applications such as generation, parsing, and natural language interface design, but real-time aspects of human linguistic capability -- in particular, learnability and the neural architecture which carries out whatever computations realize knowledge of language as biophysical behaviour. The expectation was that the speakers, all of whom are primarily specialists in either theoretical or implementation fields, would address current research concern in their own area of expertise. But the further objective of the conference was that they would, wherever appropriate, attempt to assess the relationship between the formal content of linguistic theories and the implementation of those theories.

The juxtaposition of theory and implementation in the cognitive sciences is particularly natural in terms of the research paradigm . . .

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