Street Foods: Urban Food and Employment in Developing Countries

Street Foods: Urban Food and Employment in Developing Countries

Street Foods: Urban Food and Employment in Developing Countries

Street Foods: Urban Food and Employment in Developing Countries

Synopsis

Street foods are sold in almost every country in the world. Many urban and rural people depend on them for one or more meals each day. This book explores this world of entrepreneurs in developing countries. When all of the participants in the delivery are counted, including local farmers, food processors, and street vendors, one realizes the enormous size of this "industry." Research conducted by the authors with vendors, local community leaders, and public health officials, worked not only to collect data, but to raise the hygiene of the food that is sold.

Excerpt

The Street Food Project on which this book is based encompasses a decade; revisiting the sites and writing the book took another five years. Thanking everyone who supported and encouraged this ground-breaking project is not possible: it would take another book. Further, the usual way of acknowledging assistance presumes that the author created the book alone.

Such is definitely not the case with the Street Food Project, which was a collaborative effort from the start. Based at the Equity Policy Center (EPOC), a research policy center established in Washington, D.C., to insert the differential concerns of women and men into the international development discourse, the entire enterprise was geared to principles of feminist research. Colleagues in each of the countries are featured in the appropriate chapters and in the bibliography, but deserve to be mentioned here as well: Naomi Owens and Naseem Hussain in Bangladesh; Sarah Loza in Egypt; Barbara Anne Chapman in Indonesia; Olufemi O. Kujore, Tola Olu Pearce, and V. Aina Agboh-Bankole in Nigeria; Gerald Barth and Mei-Jean Kuo in the Philippines; Jill Posner in Senegal; and Cristina Blanc Szanton, Amara Pongsapich, and Napat Sirisambhand in Thailand. The excellence of their initial studies can only be partly captured in this book; their assistance in reading over draft chapters, sending photographs and maps, and clarifying conclusions, after many years doing other work, cannot be overestimated.

Here I wish to credit the broader circles of support. Congressional hearings initiated by Congressman Donald Fraser in 1973 gave legitimacy to the arguments undergirding the Women in Development movement. Arvonne Fraser, as director of the WID Office in the U.S. Agency for International Development, supported this burgeoning effort with funds and enthusiasm; EPOC was only one of the centers and groups that benefited from her leadership, but the cumulation of activity launched the WID movement. Paula Goddard provided agency support, through which Jean Ellickson, Jane Jaquette, and John Hourihand served as program officers and good . . .

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