Ecumenical Theology in Worship, Doctrine, and Life: Essays Presented to Geoffrey Wainwright on His Sixtieth Birthday

Ecumenical Theology in Worship, Doctrine, and Life: Essays Presented to Geoffrey Wainwright on His Sixtieth Birthday

Ecumenical Theology in Worship, Doctrine, and Life: Essays Presented to Geoffrey Wainwright on His Sixtieth Birthday

Ecumenical Theology in Worship, Doctrine, and Life: Essays Presented to Geoffrey Wainwright on His Sixtieth Birthday

Synopsis

This book presents twenty essays written in honour of the noted theologian and ecumenist Geoffrey Wainwright, Cushman Professor of Christian Theology at Duke University. The editors have assembled a remarkable international roster of contributors and have organized the volume around three major themes in Wainwright's work: worship, liturgy, and mission. Contributors include Nicholas Lossky, Eberhard Jungel, Dietrich Ritschl, and Gunther Gassman.

Excerpt

Of all those human beings to whom one's gratitude and thanks is rightly given, surely one's teachers must be numbered among the most deserving. And for those whose lives are focused on the work of the Church, there are many teachers to thank: parents, Sunday school instructors, catechists and pastors, advisors and professors. Those who have been incorporated into the Body of Christ will, over the course of their lives, grow into their faith largely through the work of teachers--who communicate to them the form, the content, and the significance of the Christian life.

In the lives of those who have edited this volume and those who have contributed to it, Geoffrey Wainwright has been a teacher par excellence. By means of his rigorous scholarship, his resourceful theology, and his tireless efforts on behalf of Church unity, Geoffrey has become a true mentor to all of us; from him we have learned the vocation of the Christian theologian. And more than this: Geoffrey has become a mentor to the whole Church of Christ. He has contributed significantly to its visible unity, not only through his day-to-day work on every level of the οἰκουμένη, but also by his insistence that the Church's theology must always be integrally related to its liturgy.

Several years ago, when the idea of assembling a Festschrift first began to take shape, the editors compiled a list of about thirty potential contributors, across all denominational, geographical, and political lines. We expected that perhaps half of these would contribute. Imagine our surprise when almost every one of them not only agreed to write an essay, but actually did so! Suddenly, we were afraid we might have to ask Oxford University Press to publish the work in two volumes.

Our first inclination was to select a few choice essays from among the contributors; but the result might not have reflected the truly international and interconfessional influence of our honoree's work. So we chose instead to ask our contributors' indulgence as we set strict word-count limits and edited their essays without mercy and without remorse. We also decided not to include the essays that we, as the editors, had planned to contribute--since we were already playing sig-

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