The Complete Problem Solver

The Complete Problem Solver

The Complete Problem Solver

The Complete Problem Solver

Synopsis

This unique volume returns in its second edition, revised and updated with the latest advances in problem solving research. It is designed to provide readers with skills that will make them better problem solvers and to give up-to-date information about the psychology of problem solving. Professor Hayes provides students and professionals with practical, tested methods of defining, representing, and solving problems. Each discussion of the important aspects of human problem solving is supported by the most current research on the psychology problem solving. "The Complete Problem Solver, Second Edition" features:
• Valuable learning strategies;• Decision making methods;• Discussions of the nature of creativity and invention, and
• A new chapter on writing. "The Complete Problem Solver" utilizes numerous examples, diagrams, illustrations, and charts to help any reader become better at problem solving. See the order form for the answer to the problem below.

Excerpt

This book has two purposes. It is designed to provide you with skills that will make you a better problem solver, and to give you up-to-date information about the psychology of problem solving.

The first purpose is clearly a practical one, but I believe the second purpose is, too. It is important for people to know how their minds work. Certainly for humanistic reasons--knowledge of our human nature is valuable in itself--but it is also important because it provides us with a degree of flexibility which we might not otherwise have. If we can examine or own problem solving processes with some degree of understanding, then we have a better chance of improving them. Further, if we have some understanding of how people think, we can be more effective in helping others. Anyone who is to teach, or to tutor, or even to help a child with homework, can benefit from knowledge of how human problem solving processes work and how they can go wrong.

Early in my career as a psychologist, a student asked me about my special area of interest. I told him that I studied people's thinking processes. "Oh, thinking!" he said, "I know all about that. I'm a math major." Of course, he did know a lot about thinking--he knew about how to do it, at least in certain cases. Given a math problem, he could draw on a wealth of experience to help him find a solution. But if he were like most people, he would have a very difficult time articulating that wealth of experience; he knew how to think but he didn't know how to describe his own thinking. When they are faced with their first teaching task, whether in school or out, many professionals discover a vast difference be-

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