Social Philosophies of an Age of Crisis

Social Philosophies of an Age of Crisis

Social Philosophies of an Age of Crisis

Social Philosophies of an Age of Crisis

Excerpt

Nikolai Iakovlevitch Danilevsky (1822-1885) studied at the University of St. Petersburg, receiving a magister degree in Botany in 1849. Soon after, suspected of being mixed up in the Petrashevsky political affair, he was imprisoned for one hundred days in the Petropavlovskaya fortress--a Russian Bastille. In contrast to Dostoievsky and others involved in that affair who were condemned to hard labor in Siberia, Danilevsky was acquitted and soon appointed by the government to the staff of the governor of Vologda and later of the Samara provinces. Thereafter his career was that of a government official in charge of fairly diverse functions, now an economist or engineer in the Ministry of Agriculture, now a special governmental representative to this or that governmental body or committee. His main official position, however, one he held between 1853 and 1885, was as a specialist in fisheries; he finally became head of the Russian Commission on Fisheries.

The diversity of his official functions and a certain amount of leisure afforded him from official duties explain the variety and number of Danilevsky's publications. Besides many special publications in the field of fishery, he published a twovolume work on Darwinism , two substantial works in economics called Devaluation of the Russian Rouble , two works in political science called General European Interests (1878) and Russia and the Question of the Orient (1879), a historical monograph on the Route Followed by the Magyars , a work in the field of linguistics (on the Dictionary of the Grand Russian Language ), and a number of papers on various topics of current interest.

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