Am I Crazy, or Is It My Shrink?

Am I Crazy, or Is It My Shrink?

Am I Crazy, or Is It My Shrink?

Am I Crazy, or Is It My Shrink?

Synopsis

With over 400 types of psychotherapy available, ranging from the highly effective to the highly questionable to the downright fraudulent, the task of choosing a therapist can be daunting. Now, Am I Crazy Or Is My Shrink? gives you all the information you need to get the most effective help and to know when your therapy is working--or when it's time for a change. Drawing on years of practical experience and the most up-to-date research, the authors give you expert guidance on all the issues you should consider, whether you're seeking therapy or uncertain about the therapy you're receiving: What questions should I ask my therapist about a recommended treatment? What personal qualities and professional qualifications should I look for in a therapist? What do research studies say about the effectiveness of a particular therapy? How do I recognize when a therapist is not right for me? How can I tell when my therapist's behavior is unethical or unprofessional? What strategies can I use to evaluate my progress? The authors also provide an overview of the main branches of psychotherapy and suggest which approaches are best suited to the most commonly occurring problems, such as depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, eating disorders, relationship and sexual difficulties, and many others. Finally, the authors stress that because therapies don't come with warning labels, and because a therapist will typically apply his or her theory to whoever walks through the door, regardless of their unique symptoms and circumstances, it is essential to choose your therapist wisely, with as much forethought as possible. Am I Crazy Or Is My Shrink? empowers you to make that choice with confidence and to be a knowledgeable participant in your own treatment.

Excerpt

A patient sat in my office. Fifty-three years old, she is a veteran of our outpatient clinic, having come there for the last seven years. I am seeing her for the first time.

Every July 1, a new crop of psychiatry and psychology students enters the clinic and an old group of graduates moves out into practice after their seven years of postgraduate training. As the Director of Outpatient Services, I [LB] was personally evaluating all patients being transferred to new therapists at the beginning of a new training year and was interested in Mrs. T because her medical record showed no substantial symptoms of emotional disorder for six years.

Mrs. T initially entered treatment shortly after giving birth to her fourth child. The "baby blues" were more severe this time than in any previous pregnancy and it got so bad just before she sought treatment that some days she could not get herself out of bed. One day, she began to hear voices telling her to kill herself and the baby, she felt worthless, and the voices said that she should be punished for her mother's unhappiness. She was frightened and decided to seek help.

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