Trelawny: A Man's Life

Trelawny: A Man's Life

Trelawny: A Man's Life

Trelawny: A Man's Life

Excerpt

"We have a saying in our country that a Trelawny never lacked courage, nor a Godolphin wit, nor a Grenville loyalty." --LORD LANSDOWNE.

Now and then a man is born with a surname that fits him so well it might have been chosen for him by a poet or a painter. Edward Trelawny was one of these fortunate persons. There is a wild flavor in Trelawny that would lend a touch of romance to the most commonplace family; and that the Trelawnys never were. They were courageous, adventurous, full of vitality, eccentric, unreliable, prone to extremes; never, to judge from the family records, commonplace.

And the records go a long way back, back to the reign of Edward the Confessor when Eduni de Treloen, the first ancestor, selected a certain green river valley on the east coast of Cornwall as a favorable place to plant a family tree; selected so well--with such an eye for shelter, fertile soil, and a charming landscape--that his descendants have been content to live there ever since, on one or other of the estates along the Looe with their pleasantly rhyming names:

"Trelawne, Trelask, Trelay,
Ashleighcross, little Bell Hay
And Trendaway."

Of these Trelawne became the chief manor. Uncles and cousins of our Edward Trelawny were living there in his time. Trelawne's wooded combe, its fuchsias and myrtles and green grassplots are still in the possession of the family today.

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