Handbook for Assessing and Treating Addictive Disorders

Handbook for Assessing and Treating Addictive Disorders

Handbook for Assessing and Treating Addictive Disorders

Handbook for Assessing and Treating Addictive Disorders

Synopsis

This valuable reference offers a fresh, integrative perspective on the diagnosis and treatment of addictive disorders. The work begins with a solid theoretical base that includes essays on behavioral, familial, and psychoanalytical explanations of addiction. The sections that follow build on that base by overviewing the most significant advances in the assessment and treatment of addictive behavior. The authors give close attention to addiction among special populations. The final section examines the supervision of substance abuse counselors, and useful appendixes list sources of information on programs and credential requirements.

Excerpt

This book is the first compendium in ten years of major addictive disorders under a single cover. Eclectic reviews of etiology and treatment range from psychodynamic to behavioral perspectives on chemical dependency and eating disorders. The presentation of applied concepts, principles, and valid methods distills and simplifies the advanced research in clinical and experimental procedure. State-of-the-art interventions are provided against a backdrop of controversies and problems arising from treatment failure. Perspectives on current themes emphasize the interdisciplinary movement and direction toward a systems or integrative network of clinical and social services. By contrast, most other clinical guidebooks on addictive disorders neglect or only sparingly cover the comprehensive service delivery system.

As a reference book, this handbook combines sourcebook with training manual. Chapters summarize recent research findings regarding etiology, methodology, and therapist-client issues emergent from the infusion of ethical and legal regulations regarding confidentiality, onset and termination of treatment, and impartiality of therapist-client relationship. New developments also touch on the zeitgeist for short-term therapies focused more measurably on operational goals and objectives. Achievement of treatment outcomes in three to five months, rather than from three to five years, responds to insurance mandates for cost containment and quality assurance. Even entry into preferred provider organizations (PPOs), health maintenance organizations, and other psychiatric care management systems requires the practitioner's willingness to follow shortterm therapy guidelines. Making this conversion from a traditional training approach to a short-term approach at first appears to compromise the integrity of . . .

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