Problems of Analysis: Philosophical Essays

Problems of Analysis: Philosophical Essays

Problems of Analysis: Philosophical Essays

Problems of Analysis: Philosophical Essays

Excerpt

Some of these essays are technical, but I hope most of them will interest a reader who is not a professional philosopher. (Such a reader might care to read I-III, VI, and X before proceeding to the others. Essays XIII and XIV presuppose the most knowledge; XII is the only one that has any mathematics in it, but even there the calculations are easy.)

In each case I have chosen a problem that aroused my interest -- partly because none of the earlier solutions seemed convincing. I shall be satisfied if I have sometimes succeeded in giving answers sufficiently plain for others to be able to profit from my mistakes.

With one exception (the last) all these essays have been written since the publication of my previous collection, Language and Philosophy (1949). In the case of the seven that have been previously published (I-VI, XIV), I have allowed myself the luxury of minor improvements, but no radical changes have been made.

It has been my good fortune to have the help of a number of friends, whose generous criticism has done much to improve these papers. I am especially grateful to Kurt Baier, Peter Geach, William H. Hay, Leonard Linsky, Abraham Melden, John Myhill, Frederick L. Will, Paul Ziff, and my colleagues at Cornell.

Permission to reprint some of these essays was kindly granted by the editors of Science and Civilization, Philosophical Review, Analysis, Proceedings of the American Philosophical Association, Mind, and Philosophical Studies: Essays in Memory of L. Susan Stebbing. (Further details will . . .

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