No More Comrades

No More Comrades

No More Comrades

No More Comrades

Excerpt

ON THE MORNING of October 30, 1956, two telegrams were delivered to M.T.I., the official Hungarian news agency, where I worked as a staff photographer. They came from press services in London and Paris. Both urgently begged M.T.I. to send photographs of Hungary's week-old Freedom Revolution.

The woman in charge, an old-line Communist, held the messages in trembling hands. She could hear the tanks now in the hands of the Freedom Fighters -- the new national army -- rumbling down Tanacs Boulevard to press the fight against the remaining Russians.

Our Comrade Chief -- perhaps out of fear, perhaps to get credit in case the patriots won -- turned to me and said:

"I wish I could send some pictures to London, but unfortunately no mails are going out at present."

That same morning the M.T.I. staff elected a revolutionary council, following the example of the workers in factories and shops throughout the country. I was chosen chairman. We had already discussed how we could get pictures of our Freedom Revolution out to the free world. We wanted people everywhere to learn about our nation's fight . . .

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