M. N. Roy's Mission to China: The Communist-Kuomintang Split of 1927

M. N. Roy's Mission to China: The Communist-Kuomintang Split of 1927

M. N. Roy's Mission to China: The Communist-Kuomintang Split of 1927

M. N. Roy's Mission to China: The Communist-Kuomintang Split of 1927

Excerpt

M. N. Roy was undoubtedly the most colorful of all non-Russian Communists in the era of Lenin and Stalin. A Hindu Brahmin by birth, an ardent Indian nationalist and revolutionary in his youth, and a convert to Marxism only after the Bolshevik revolution in Russia, he rose rapidly within the Comintern hierarchy to become the most prominent Asian exponent and theoretician of communism for Asia. As a member of the Executive Committee and Presidium of the Communist International, his influence was cleary identifiable in Comintern resolutions throughout most of the twenties, and his concepts of revolution for the colonies and so-called semicolonies were incorporated into many of the most important decisions of the Communist International.

In August, 1920, Roy's Supplementary Theses on the National and Colonial Questions complemented the Theses prepared by Lenin and provided a theoretical basis for Communist political strategy and tactics in the colonies and "semicolonies" which is still recognizable in Soviet and Chinese Communist practice. It is no exaggeration to state that Roy ranks with Lenin and Mao Tse-tung in the development of fundamental Communist policy for the underdeveloped, as contrasted with the industrialized, areas of the globe.

In 1927 the Communist International assigned Roy the task of troubleshooting the alliance between the Kuomintang and the Chinese Communist Party, which was suffering increasingly disruptive stress. As it turned out, his failure to achieve a satisfactory solution made him persona non grata -- or more precisely, perhaps, a scapegoat -- in the eyes of Stalin, and so it was that the China mission, which might have enhanced his already considerable prestige within the Comintern, actually brought about his political downfall.

Reaching China on the eve of the fatefully important Fifth Congress . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.