Science in the Cause of Man

Science in the Cause of Man

Science in the Cause of Man

Science in the Cause of Man

Excerpt

"THERE IS NO PANACEA FOR PROTECTION FROM NUCLEAR ATTACK," says the pamphlet Fallout Protection, issued by theDepartment of Defense. "In a major attack upon our country, millions would be killed. There appears to be no practical program that would avoid large-scale loss of life." This is a historic admission by our federal government. Faced with the prospect of nuclear war, the government declares, in effect, that it cannot carry out the functions for which it was constituted; it cannot provide for the common defense, much less insure domestic tranquillity. Survival is up to the citizen. "A sane and sober person," the pamphlet says, ". . . would draw on his reserve of courage and intelligence -- and the unquenchable will to live -- and begin to build again."

Despite its candor on the ultimate utility of the effort, the administration is committed to a $700-million expenditure on civil defense. The issue is, no doubt, a source of anguish to public officials; it is not surprising that they should want to buy "insurance" for their constituents against their own inability to carry out their awesome responsibilities. To the sane and sober citizen, however, it would seem that the time to summon his will to live, his courage and intelligence, is now.

The issue of civil defense arises at the end of this book. It comes . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.