Muntu: An Outline of the New African Culture

Muntu: An Outline of the New African Culture

Muntu: An Outline of the New African Culture

Muntu: An Outline of the New African Culture

Excerpt

Whatever human beings think and do and produce concerns all other human beings. KARL JASPERS

I. QUO VADis AFRICA?

Africa is entering world history. There is a flow of books and articles dealing with this process in its political, economic, sociological and psychological aspects. But an these expositions have in common a single conviction; they are all persuaded that one single pattern of cultural change is forming. Through the influence of Europe, it is believed, Africa is adapting herself, giving up her traditions and adopting foreign ideas, methods of work, forms of government and principles of economic organization. The time of transition, whether short or long, is thought to be a time of crisis which will confront all Africans with the decision either to accept modern civilization and survive, or to perish with their own traditions. Some observers believe in a gradual, as others in a sudden, transition, but all are agreed that a fully Europeanized Africa will be the end product of the process. Europe is alleged to provide the model, Africa to copy it; Europe to be spiritually the giving, Africa the receiving partner.

Since Europe is held to be the teacher and Africa the pupil, Europe is to decide when Africa is ripe: ripe for a faith, ripe for action, ripe for freedom. Europe is thought to know what is good for Africa, better than Africa herself. Admittedly, Europe offers different and rival doctrines -- democracy or communism, Christi anity . . .

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