Systematic Psychology: Prolegomena

Systematic Psychology: Prolegomena

Systematic Psychology: Prolegomena

Systematic Psychology: Prolegomena

Excerpt

In the early summer of 1917, Professor Titchener began writing his Systematic Psychology, -- a book long projected. There was to be a first volume of Prolegomena, and as many subsequent volumes as the systematic setting forth of the facts of psychology required. The book was to be his final word on the establishment of scientific psychology, coördinate with biology and physics; in a very concrete sense, it was to be a summing up of the reading, thinking, and experimental investigation in psychology which had occupied him during his entire professional life.

Characteristically, he faced the problem afresh. He put behind him his previous judgments, dropped the polemic attitude which had shaped much of his earlier writing, and, as best he could, assumed an open mind. For two years he worked indefatigably. The Introduction was ready for the printer, and the original draft of Chapter I written, by November. The first chapter, however, did not reach its final form until the early spring of the next year and was typewritten for the last time in 1923. In the meantime, he was at work on Chapter II, which he finished in May, 1918. Chapter III engrossed his attention thenceforth, and was not put aside as complete until December, 1919. Of the projected first volume there remained only a chapter . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.