Instructional Theories in Action: Lessons Illustrating Selected Theories and Models

Instructional Theories in Action: Lessons Illustrating Selected Theories and Models

Instructional Theories in Action: Lessons Illustrating Selected Theories and Models

Instructional Theories in Action: Lessons Illustrating Selected Theories and Models

Synopsis

Companion volume to the award-winning best seller Instructional Design Theories and Models, this book serves as a concrete introduction to instructional design for curriculum developers, teachers and teacher trainers, and students. Eight major theorists translate their works and theories into sets of instructional prescriptions; corresponding model lessons provide step-by-step illustrations of these theories.

Instructional Theories in Action features:

• overviews of the most important prescriptions and corresponding sample lesson plans written by the original theorists;

• practical, concrete approaches to presenting the major strategies and principles;

• model lessons focusing on the same objectives to facilitate comparisons of the theories;

• numbered comments that identify which instructional prescription is being implemented at each point of the sample lessons;

• chapter introductions, footnotes, and student study questions, and

• clear identification and cross referencing of commonalities that are often masked by varying terminology.

Excerpt

Barbara Petry,Harry Mouton, Charles M. Reigeluth Syracuse University

History

The Gagné-Briggs theory of instruction was first developed in the 1960s, although its development has continued to date. It is affectionately known by many as the granddaddy of instructional theories. It was the first major attempt to integrate a wide range of knowledge about learning and instruction (from many theoretical perspectives) into a comprehensive theory of instruction. Its impact on the field has been immense.

Unique Contributions

One of the most outstanding features of the Gagné-Briggs instructional theory is that it is so comprehensive. It prescribes the nature of instruction for all three of Bloom's domains of knowledge: cognitive, affective, and psychomotor; and within the cognitive domain it prescribes methods for teaching verbal information (remember-level knowledge), intellectual skills (application of generalizable knowledge), and cognitive strategies (the higher thought processes).

This instructional theory is also comprehensive in the breadth of instructional strategies that it prescribes. The nine events of instruction include gaining the learners' attention, presenting objectives, and stimulating recall of relevant prior knowledge, all of which have tended to be overlooked by more recent instructional theories. In fairness, however, it should be pointed out that many of the more recent theorists have opted to sacrifice breadth in order to achieve greater . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.