Conquest and Union: Fashioning a British State, 1485-1725

Conquest and Union: Fashioning a British State, 1485-1725

Conquest and Union: Fashioning a British State, 1485-1725

Conquest and Union: Fashioning a British State, 1485-1725

Synopsis

The British Isles is a multi-national arena, but its history has traditionally been studied from a distinctively English -- often, indeed, London -- perspective. Now, however, the interweaving of the distinct but mutually-dependent histories of the four nations is at the heart of some of the liveliest historical research today. In this major contribution to that research, eleven leading scholars consider key aspects of the internal relations of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales in the early modern period, and the problems of accommodating different -- and resistant -- cultures to a single centralizing polity.
The contributors are: Sarah Barber; Toby Barnard; Ciaran Brady; Keith M. Brown; Jane Dawson; Steven G. Ellis; David Hayton; Philip Jenkins; Alan Macinnes; Michael Mac Craith; and John Morrill.

Excerpt

In preparing this volume we have incurred a number of debts. In particular, we should like to acknowledge the support of Ken Churchill and of the British Council in Dublin which paid for a succession of visiting speakers to Galway and made a substantial grant towards the costs of holding the conference at which the concept of British history and preliminary drafts of the papers published here were debated. The Research and Development Committee of University College, Galway (UCG) also made a large contribution towards the project, and we are grateful to the president of UCG, Dr Colm Ó hEocha, and the college for their support and the use of their facilities. The Royal Historical Society gave financial assistance towards the costs of the keynote address at the conference, by Dr John Morrill, vice-president of the society. The publishers have also worked hard to ensure that they became a coherent volume of essays on a specific theme. Finally, we should like to thank our fellow contributors who agreed to write to an overall scheme and an ambitious schedule, and very often outside their own areas of expertise. In the interests of uniformity, we have standardized some of the terminology, but it should not be assumed that the contributors necessarily agree with these usages and with the overall perspective.

S.G.E. and S.B.

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